In 2015, a higher percentage of female than of male students ages 12–18 reported being bullied at school during the school year (23 vs. 19 percent), as well as being the subject of rumors (15 vs. 9 percent). In contrast, a higher percentage of male than of female students reported being threatened with harm (5 vs. 3 percent).

 

Rates of bullying vary across studies (from 9% to 98%). A meta-analysis of 80 studies analyzing bullying involvement rates (for both bullying others and being bullied) for 12-18 year old students reported a mean prevalence rate of 35% for traditional bullying involvement and 15% for cyberbullying involvement

 

33% of students who reported being bullied at school indicated that they were bullied at least once or twice a month during the school year

 

Of those students who reported being bullied, 13% were made fun of, called names, or insulted; 12% were the subject of rumors; 5% were pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on; and 5% were excluded from activities on purpose

 

A slightly higher portion of female than of male students report being bullied at school (23% vs. 19%). In contrast, a higher percentage of male than of female students report being physically bullied (6% vs. 4%) and threatened with harm

 

Bullied students reported that bullying occurred in the following places: the hallway or stairwell at school (42%), inside the classroom (34%), in the cafeteria (22%), outside on school grounds (19%), on the school bus (10%), and in the bathroom or locker room (9%)

 

43% of bullied students report notifying an adult at school about the incident. Students who report higher rates of bullying victimization are more likely to report the bullying

 

More than half of bullying situations (57%) stop when a peer intervenes on behalf of the student being bullied

 

School-based bullying prevention programs decrease bullying by up to 25% 

 

Students who experience bullying are at increased risk for poor school adjustment, sleep difficulties, anxiety, and depression

 

Students who are both targets of bullying and engage in bullying behavior are at greater risk for both mental health and behavior problems than students who only bully or are only bullied

 

Bullied students indicate that bullying has a negative effect on how they feel about themselves (19%), their relationships with friends and family and on their school work (14%), and physical health (9%)

 

Students who experience bullying are twice as likely as non-bullied peers to experience negative health effects such as headaches and stomachaches

 

Youth who self-blame and conclude they deserved to be bullied are more likely to face negative outcomes, such as depression, prolonged victimization, and maladjustment

 

Among high school students, 15.5% are cyberbullied and 20.2% are bullied on school property

 

Among middle school students, 24% are cyberbullied and 45% are bullied on school property

 

The percentages of individuals who have experienced cyberbullying at some point in their lifetimes have nearly doubled (18% to 34%) from 2007-2016

 

90% of teens who report being cyberbullied have also been bullied offline

 

23% of students who reported being cyberbullied notified an adult at school about the incident

 

Only 40–50% of cyberbullying targets are aware of the identity of the perpetrator

 

 

Those who are cyberbullied are also likely to be bullied offline 

 

 

When assessing specific types of disabilities, prevalence rates differ: 35.3% of students with behavioral and emotional disorders, 33.9% of students with autism, 24.3% of students with intellectual disabilities, 20.8% of students with health impairments, and 19% of students with specific learning disabilities face high levels of bullying victimization (Rose et al., 2012).

 

 

Students with specific learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, emotional and behavior disorders, other health impairments, and speech or language impairments report greater rates of victimization than their peers without disabilities longitudinally and their victimization remains consistent over time

 

Researchers discovered that students with disabilities were more worried about school safety and being injured or harassed by other peers compared to students without a disability

 

When reporting bullying youth in special education were told not to tattle almost twice as often as youth not in special education 

 

25% of African-American students, 22% of Caucasian students, 17% of Hispanic students, and 9% of Asian students report being bullied at school

 

More than one third of adolescents reporting bullying report bias-based school bullying

 

Bias-based bullying is more strongly associated with compromised health than general bullying

 

Race-related bullying is significantly associated with negative emotional and physical health effects

 

74.1% of LGBT students were verbally bullied (e.g., called names, threatened) in the past year because of their sexual orientation and 55.2% because of their gender expression

 

36.2% of LGBT students were physically bullied (e.g., pushed, shoved) in the past year because of their sexual orientation and 22.7% because of their gender expression

 

49% of LGBT students experienced cyberbullying in the past year

 

Peer victimization of all youth was less likely to occur in schools with bullying policies that are inclusive of LGBTQ students

 

55.5% of LGBT students feel unsafe at school because of their sexual orientation, and 37.8% because of their gender expression

 

30.3% of LGBT students missed at least one entire day at school in the past month because they felt unsafe or uncomfortable, and 10.6% missed four or more days in the past month

 

There are less rates of LGBTQ bullying in schools with clear bullying policies that are inclusive of LGBTQ students

 

There is a strong association between bullying and suicide-related behaviors, but this relationship is often mediated by other factors, including depression, violent behavior, and substance abuse

 

Students who bully others, are bullied, or witness bullying are more likely to report high levels of suicide-related behavior than students who report no involvement in bullying

 

​A meta-analysis found that students facing peer victimization are 2.2 times more likely to have suicide ideation and 2.6 times more likely to attempt suicide than students not facing victimization

Students who are both bullied and engage in bullying behavior are the highest risk group for adverse outcomes

The false notion that suicide is a natural response to being bullied has the dangerous potential to normalize the response and thus create copycat behavior among youth. 

Bullied youth were most likely to report that actions that accessed support from others made a positive difference

New York, USA 

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